Revere Beach Tops the Competition

July 8, 2016
By

By Cary Shuman

City and business officials and environmental group leaders are pleased with the favorable publicity that Revere Beach has been receiving at a time when one of the biggest showcase events of the year hits the city in two weeks.

Mayor Brian Arrigo, Revere Chamber of Commerce (RCC) Executive Director Bob Upton, and Save The Harbor/Save the Bay Director of Communications and Bruce Berman said they were happy with Boston Magazine’s positive portrayal of the beach in an article written by Kyle Scott Clauss.

The story appeared as the Revere Beach Partnership and the city ready for the more than 800,000 visitors expected for the annual Revere Beach International Sand Sculpting Festival that is set for July 22-24.

“Recently Boston Magazine highlighted Revere Beach as a hidden gem of the Boston, area,” said Arrigo.

“As the article mentions, Revere Beach was noted by Save The Harbor/Save the Bay as having some of the cleanest water of any beach in America. This is a testament to the work that has been done over the past few decades to clean up the water in our area; anyone who visited Revere Beach regularly can definitely see the improvement.”

Upton, a noted Revere Beach historian and new leader of the RCC whose offices have relocated to 200 Winthrop Ave. (across from McMackin Park), also enjoyed the tribute to the beach.

“As executive director of the Chamber of Commerce, I’m always happy to hear positive comments about the beach and what it means to local businesses,” said Upton.

Upton also noted the springtime opening the Vanguard Waterfront Square Apartments, which are new luxury beachfront residences at 660 Ocean St., calling them a “beautiful new development” for the city.

Berman said recognition for Revere Beach has been long overdue.

“It’s about time,” said Berman, while noting Revere Beach’s status as the oldest public beach in America. “All of the region’s public beaches have something great about them, but Revere has so much going for it, whether it’s the events and activities like the Sandcastle Festival, the clean water, or Kelly’s Roast Beef, there’s something for everybody.”

The beach being a destination for food enthusiasts was also not lost on Arrigo, who often visited the beach as a young boy growing up in the city.

“Beyond the clean water and the beach’s natural beauty, Revere Beach also offers great amenities for residents and visitors alike,” said Arrigo. “There’s so much to enjoy – from the famous Kelly’s Roast Beef and Bianchi’s Pizza, to hidden gems on Shirley Avenue like Thmor Da and Casablanca.

“I look forward to continuing to shine a spotlight on what makes Revere Beach so great, as it truly is the showpiece of our community. I also look forward to working together with the City Council, our state delegation and our residents to make it even better,” concluded the mayor.

An aerial view of Revere Beach taken during the Sand Sculpting Festival in 2015. The three mile stretch of sand and water has been rated the top public beach in the area.

An aerial view of Revere Beach taken during the Sand Sculpting Festival in 2015. The three mile stretch of sand and water has been rated the top public beach in the area.

  • Italod

    LOL. The only thing in 2016 that makes Revere Beach a beach, is that it has a seawall, ocean, salt water, sand and tides. Even walking up on Lynn Shore Drive–yes, terrible occasional seaweed smell and all–that’s a beach that has real character, with the railings, extensive rocks and tidal pools, landscaping and paths and parks mix, seawalls, quaint shops and seaside homes, and huge and flat sand tidelines to walk on. Revere Beach’s annual Sandsculpting Festival is great, I’ll admit–but the area is too crowded for the throngs it wants to host for these things now, and other than that it looks like a sterile civil beach in some Eastern European country along the Black Sea.

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