Letters To The Editor

Readers beware

Dear Editor:

I’m not sure if most residents are aware of the Facebook Page “Revere Scanner.” It has recently gained lots of popularity, negative and positive. It has close to 4,000 followers. I, for one, (along with many others) absolutely am not a fan of this particular page and the people behind it. They are all over the board as far as posting Revere Scanner issues and instead posting a lot of nonsense and things of no importance. They constantly stir the pot, contradict themselves, and cause a lot of drama.

I recently read a post posted by the pages “Main Mod.”

It read as follows, “Not to beat a dead horse, but I am reading disturbing reports about the protocols or lack thereof in terms of separating Seacoast students from elementary school students. In your opinion can you explain how the protocols work and if there needs to be an improvement in the protocols? – Main Mod”

This was my reply:

“I read the post about the protocols regarding the separation of the elementary school and Seacoast. I’d just like to say a few things.

It seems to me that a lot of people are biased against the children in Seacoast. People act like they are a total danger to society and that they pollute other schools and the “normal children.” If that was the case, and they were that much of a danger, these kids would be in jail or locked up in a mental facility.

I agree that the kids in Seacoast are there for a reason. Whether it is for discipline reasons, disabilities, insubordination, or truancy. Some kids go there because they can’t handle the pressures that normal teens face in the regular schools and feel more accepted and at home there.

That being said, there are many kids that go to regular schools in Revere that have the same, if not worse, issues than the children in Seacoast. They just fly under the radar and go unnoticed by parents and teachers.

Shootings, rapes, threats, suicide/suicide pacts, and fights happen everyday across America in “regular” schools.

I feel it is a bit offensive to label these children and treat them like they have some sort of deadly disease that will spread and endanger the children in the “regular” schools. Give me a break!

I agree that there should be separation, as some of those children can be a disruption or distraction to other children. But that is the extent of it. Stop being such babies, and stop being so ignorant. It could be your sweet, innocent child in the “regular” school that shoots up the place, or rapes someone, or beats somebody up, or skips school, or gets in trouble all the time. wake up!!”

After my comment, I received tons of positive comments and feedback in regards to my reply from many former students and other citizens of Revere. One person who I will not name made a comment, “I know a kid who’s in seacoast & is such an incredible kid! Nicest kid you will meet! Agree with you 100 percent.”

Revere Scanner’s Reply, “Maybe a Seacoast meet and greet is in order? – main mod”

Really?

As a former student of Seacoast, I am very offended by the post by the Revere Scanner page. I feel that they are generalizing and twisting an issue when there shouldn’t be an issue at all. Seacoast is a school made to help children that have a hard time coping in a mainstream school. Seacoast has helped many children get through the sometimes tough process of graduating school and succeeding after graduation.

When I was 2 1/2 years old I contracted a deadly infection called Bacterial Meningitis (Meningococcemia). It is an infection in the blood. I actually died and had to be revived in the ambulance en route to the hospital. As a result I was placed in intensive care at the Children’s Hospital for two months. Because of the infection in my blood, the circulation to my limbs was cut off and as a result I had to have partial amputations on both my feet. I had 30 reconstructive surgeries on my legs, back, and hips and had skin grafts taken from my body to replace the lost skin on my feet.

To show the severity of the illness– From 2003 to 2007 in the United States there were 4,100 cases of bacterial meningitis, 500 of those cases resulted in death. Thank God, I survived and thrived.

The reason I say this is because it was not easy to go to a “regular” school with “regular” kids. Of coarse I made friends, but my anxieties and depression always overcame me. I felt as though I did not fit in. My grades were failing because of this. That is the reason my parents and I decided that I go to Seacoast. I felt like I fit in. I felt accepted and at home. I did well and passed all of my classes. The teachers and the Principal Tom Misci were supportive and were my friends. They helped me through it.

My sister Kori also went to Seacoast. She was the first student ever from Seacoast to make Captain of a Revere High sports team and the first ever allowed to play sports for Revere High School. She played Powder Puff (flag football) and helped carry them to victory.

I was voted prom queen in my junior year and was the first person from Seacoast to ever have that honor.

My sister and I both graduated in 2004 and went on to college. We both received our associate’s degrees and both graduated with honors. We are both highly successful and now both have jobs working for our great state of Massachusetts. We are both engaged to men who are also extremely successful and set to be married in 2015.

The reason I tell you all this is because the image that people have about kids that go to Seacoast is all wrong. Sure, there are plenty of kids that have some severe issues and need special attention. But to say that they are all criminals or bad people and to treat them like a circus sideshow act is wrong. There are so many success stories that come from Seacoast.

My point is Seacoast is a school that is designed to help children get by. Just because you go to a “regular” school doesn’t mean that you are not dangerous or a criminal or have problems or disabilities. There are children in every school, in every place in America that have the potential and capability to do harm to other students. It doesn’t matter what school they go to. Stop being so one sided and judgmental and open your eyes people. Seacoast is not the problem. Bad things can happen anywhere at anytime to anyone. Things are going to happen weather you are in a “regular’ school or not, and that’s that.

The Revere Scanner page, from what I’ve read, was made to report what happens on the actual Revere Scanner. It was made to keep the citizens of Revere informed on incidents happening around the city.

It has turned out to be the exact opposite. I would compare it to the show TMZ. Where information is made up and and/or twisted around, or the gossip magazine ‘The Enquirer,’ where lies are told and drama explodes.

In my opinion, the word Revere should be taken down from that page. It is an embarrassment to this great city. Instead it should be called ‘Local City Forum and Gossip Page’ with the disclaimer, “If you want to have a good laugh, if you love drama, or you love a good old fashioned, unintelligent argument, ENTER HERE.”

I do not follow their page for accurate information. I follow it for the entertainment factor. I would never be able to say these things via their ‘page’ because although they encourage you to voice your opinion, if you say something that they do not agree with they immediately delete your post and ban you from their page.

Molly O’Hara

Congrats to Tony

Dear Editor:

Congratulations to Revere native and Mystic Valley Regional Charter School basketball coach Tony Ferullo for receiving the “Coach of the Year” honors for 2014-2015 selected by the Commonwealth Athletic Conference coaches. Last week’s Revere Journal cited his numerous accomplishments during his tenure at MVRCS where he built the program from the ground up as well as his successful nineteen-year coaching span.

I met first met Tony in 1974 at Suffolk University where we were Journalism students, Suffolk Journal reporters, and basketball aficionados. In the early to late seventies, we, along with other guys from Revere, Winthrop, Malden, and other surrounding areas played hoops across many local YMCA’s and fielded the same team in a very competitive Suffolk University intramural basketball league over several years. We also rented the old Whalen School gym one night a week for years –at an outrageous cost of “$50 for four hours”, barley scraping up enough money to pay for it.  Even then his knowledge of the game was admired by his peers and his fervor quite evident. You just knew he was going to be winning coach.

Tony possesses a basketball IQ like no other that is complemented by his motivational ability, ensuring his players a put in the best position to win, using their individual skills for the betterment of team. His teaching acumen is fascinating because over the years his teams have been known for discipline, sound preparation, and a deep-rooted passion that transcends directly from him. Needless to say, his record speaks for itself.

During his Suffolk days he covered the Rams under two outstanding and long-time basketball coaches/athletic directors – Charlie Law and Jim Nelson. For years he has been a News Director at Suffolk University, basketball coach, and a director of an annual Fun-Damentals basketball camp.

Again, congrats and continued success – no doubt about it.

Stephen Fielding

Racing at Suffolk Downs

Dear Editor:

Re: Column in Revere Journal, Wed., March 18, 2015 by Seth Daniel:

Suffolk Downs help included in bill

The bill that is being referred to is a bill that would allow live racing and simulcasting until 2016. I have faith in the Horsemen Benevolent Association and other race tracks that they will help Suffolk Downs to keep racing alive after 2016.

Thanks to House Speaker, Robert A. DeLeo and Representative, RoseLee Vincent for t heir strong support for the employees, horse lovers, and the vendors who supply goods to Suffolk Downs. Also thanks to other legislators for t heir strong support.
Friend of Suffolk Downs,

Vincent F. Cammarata

Former Security Officer

Journal Staff:

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