Revere Police Officer Resigns after Stealing Police Money

July 11, 2014
By

A Revere Police Officer resigned earlier this year after admitting that he stole money used in a controlled drug buy last December.

Former Officer Carlos Amaro resigned several months ago when faced with the allegations, but City officials have been slow to confirm or explain what led to that resignation.

Just recently, in a filing on an unrelated case, Suffolk County District Attorney Dan Conley’s Office detailed the circumstances surrounding Amaro’s resignation.

According to that document, on Dec. 27, 2013, Revere Police had been conducting a drug investigation and executed a search warrant at the target’s apartment. Inside the target’s coat, police located an unknown amount of cash that had been used earlier in a controlled, undercover drug buy.

The DA’s filing indicated that Officer Amaro stole the money in the coat between the initial Revere Police search and the follow-up search by the State Police.

It also indicated he admitted to the theft.

“The money was left in the jacket until the Massachusetts State Police K-9 Unit arrived and completed its search of the target apartment,” read the filing. “Officer Amaro had been inside the target bedroom after the money and drugs had been initially located. After the K-9 Unit finished its search of the apartment, detectives discovered the cash was missing. The cash was later recovered from Officer Amaro.”

The filing indicated that Amaro was placed on administrative leave for an investigation – which included the fact that Amaro apparently admitted to the theft when confronted.

He was charged internally within the Revere Police for violating department policies, including ‘F1 Criminal Conduct’ and ‘F4 Conduct Unbecoming an Officer.’

Amaro officially resigned on Jan. 3.

The Journal has repeatedly inquired about the situation, but City officials have yet to confirm the details surrounding the resignation.

DA Spokesman Jake Wark said there are no criminal charges.

“There are no charges against Amaro at this stage,” he said.

The court filing regarding Amaro in the unrelated case, he said, is part of the DA’s affirmative disclosure policy, which DA Conley implemented to reduce the likelihood of a case being overturned on appeal. It was also implemented to ensure a defendant receives a fair trial.

The procedure most notably was used during the beginning stages of the Annie Dookhan trial, which focused on falsifying records at the State Drug Lab.

Amaro had served in the Revere Police Department as a calltaker for several years, being known as a friendly, helpful face at the front counter of the old station.

He left his position as calltaker in 2009 to enter the Police Academy in order to become a Revere Police Officer. However, after graduation, he and several other officers were unable to be hired due to the City’s financial difficulties. He was hired by the Saugus Police Department, and then made a lateral transfer back to Revere in March 2012 when an opening came up.

Revere Police confirmed this week that Amaro was no longer a police officer in Revere, but referred any other questions to DA Conley.

  • waltercarlson

    Why does someone who has gotten a good job with great pay screw up like this. This has happened to too many departments and something must be done. What kind of screening is done with these guys?

  • http://www.policemisconduct.net Film The Police Always

    now watch the corrupt State Attorney not file charges. They are all corrupt, and it’s the State Attorneys across the nation that are causing the crimes we read about when people shoot cops. The people are pissed and have had enough of cops getting away with all of their crimes including murder.

  • NAna

    So did the cop give back the money?

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