Panera Bread Coming to Revere

October 24, 2012
By

Panera Bread is apparently looking seriously at sites in Revere in order to locate one of their popular eateries in our city.

Those of you who have experienced Panera Bread can attest to the chain restaurant’s great pastries and coffee, breakfasts and lunches and dinners. They make great soup, serve wonderful salads, juices and drinks in a fun atmosphere where people like to congregate.

Best of all, Panera Bread officials know how decorate their locations so they are inviting and warm.

Panera is said to be looking for a location already in existence or are said to be willing to build one of their own.

We would suggest Panera consider the Wonderland Shopping Center which is about to lose its Stop and Shop. Panera doesn’t need all that space but could certainly locate nicely in some of it – and the added plus here is the parking. There is plenty of parking which a Panera requires.

Panera coming to Revere would be great business for the city and even greater business for the restaurant. This city is the right demographic for a Panera Bread.

Their pricing reflects the pricing sensibilities that residents have here.

An average Panera Bread would employ as many as 50 people and would generate a large payroll and would use an enormous amount of local goods and services.

We hope Panera Bread follows through on its promise to locate here.

It would find Revere a very friendly place to do business.

  • Dave

    Why is it that insular Reverites refuse to allow “outsiders” to start any kind of business establishments to set up shop in Revere unless those outsiders are a tacky chain, and then everyone (including the local “media”) welcomes them with open arms. You do realize that this is the kind of attitude that Podunk towns in the middle of Arkansas are usually known for right? Why does a city that shares a border with a world-class city like Boston insist on being that way?

  • truth seeker

    I love how the journal pulls employment numbers out of their butts! 50 employees?
    This is the same paper that proclaim a Market Basket would employ 600-700 people in ONE STORE! But when Stop and Shop announced they would close it said it only employed 110 employees. How can there be such a huge gap? Simple, the Market Basket number is bogus but it made Josh feel good when writing it. A supermarket of that size employs about 100-125 people, most part time (less than 20 hours a week). ]
    This same paper favors a soccer stadium which would create few jobs, almost all part time and seasonal over a mall. A mall of stores would create many more jobs, much more tax revenue, and would not bring all of their customers to their location ALL at once. But you see Rizzo wants the stadium so that means Josh wants the stadium. Truth be damned. It should be on the papers mast head.

  • Italod

    Dave, you’re right. And it’ll always be this way, until all the close-minded fossils who grew up in Revere pass away. We’ll never get a Panera. When a new space opens up, we either get owned vacant lots that exist for 40 years (note: Revere Beach Boulevard), or gas stations, Dollar stores, bank outlets, tacky restaurants, nail salons, 24/7 small marts, or cellphone or eyeglass stores. OH, I’m sorry I forgot Taco Bells. This is Revere, it has always been so. Because nobody cares, and it’s not a real city and has no class or sense of future.

  • RevereReporter (STAFF)

    This, too, is an editorial rather than a news story, for what it’s worth.

  • drensber

    “We would suggest Panera consider the Wonderland Shopping Center which is about to lose its Stop and Shop. Panera doesn’t need all that space but could certainly locate nicely in some of it – and the added plus here is the parking. There is plenty of parking which a Panera requires”

    It is not a given that a Panera “requires” lots of parking… look at the one in Brookline, for example. I would say that the main advantage of the Wonderland Shopping Center is that it’s near the Wonderland T-station (get it? they both have “Wonderland” in their name if that helps you remember). One of the most unfortunate things about the Stop and Shop closing is that with the completion of the bridge over the T-station, residents of the beach would have been able to easily walk to a grocery store for the first time in decades. “Walkability” is one of the things that most young people in the 21st century look for in a place to live, not shopping centers with large parking lots and chain restaurants.

    Why does everyone in Revere always think of everything from a 1953-era automobile-oriented development perspective? I’m sure this makes perfect sense to the large elderly population in Revere (who, unfortunately, are the only ones who vote in local elections, I think), but newspapers are supposed to try to help things move forward.

  • Valerie

    Sooo happy! I’ve been waiting to hear this for years. I love Panera.

  • FrankBoston

    Give it a chance…it only takes one or two chains like this (above average chain restaurants) to make a move to get other businesses thinking about opening in the area. Next thing you know, a Starbucks will move in simply to compete against Panera. SBux did say Revere was not their ‘demographics’, but this can easily change if they want to compete against Panera.

  • drensber

    I disagree. I think that when an enterprising area restaurant entrepreneur sees a town that thinks that Panera Bread and Starbucks are really classy, they’ll just assume that no one would be interested in any business that they’d start anyway. Did the revitalization of Somerville or Jamaica Plain start with high-end chains opening? Of course not.

    Of course the local pols love the big chains because they appear, on the surface, to provide more tax revenue. That may be true, but that tax revenue comes at the expense of making the city look like just another bland middle-class suburb where no one else would want to live or start a business.

  • karen hanson

    Marshalls is also closing, I hear in March?

  • drensber

    This is not surprising. Revere has a decision to make: It can either face the reality that it is very densely populated and close to a major city and try to build up and become a more urban area that would appeal to young people or it can continue to bow to the wishes of crusty old people (who hold most of the political power in the city) and become a more desolate and run-down car-oriented (but traffic gridlocked) suburban area.

    A development like “Wonderland Marketplace” is basically suburban strip-mall with an enormous parking lot located right next to a T station and a block from the beach. Basically it makes no sense.

    Best option would be to plow it down, and invite some creative people to propose ideas for a plot of land whose proximity to the ocean and public transit would make it extremely desirable anywhere besides Revere. Hint: The people who would probably be best qualified to do this probably _aren’t_ from Revere. Since the in-breds in Revere always seem to put insular mentality above everything else, I suspect that in the long run, we’ll eventually just squander any potentially innovative use of this property and join Lynn in having the only other sea-side Wal*Mart in the US.

  • Revere Resident

    “This city is the right demographic for a Panera Bread.”
    Are you kidding me?

  • drensber

    Why not? Revere is full of uptight lower-middle-class white people with somewhat bad taste. A mediocre chain like Panera is perfect.

    In all seriousness, a Panera wouldn’t be the worst thing by any stretch of the imagination. Much better than an empty storefront. But getting excited about the prospect of a bland chain restaurant is just pathetic.

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