McKinley Project Wins Key State Approval

April 13, 2011
By

-By Seth Daniel

seth@reverejournal.com

The ball is officially rolling on the new McKinley School as the state School Building Authority (MSBA) approved the project for its capital pipeline last week.

Getting the school built has been a fight that has lasted several generations, with disgruntled parental advocates whose disappointments stretch back to the 1970s. And while no shovels are in the ground yet, it is the furthest anyone has come to replacing the 110-year-old school.

Mayor Tom Ambrosino was the driving force behind the approval, as was Superintendent Paul Dakin, and both said this week that not only did they get the ball rolling on the school, but they will probably get a much bigger school than anticipated.

Ambrosino said it could be a four-story school that could comfortably house 550 students – something desperately needed as elementary enrollment figures have soared over the last five years.

“We’re one of the few communities with a growing school population,” said the mayor. They recognize that and see the need for more space. They’re open to the fact this might need to be a much bigger building than what we contemplated 10 to 12 years ago.”

Being voted into the pipeline means that the City will have to pony up $1 million to enter into the Schematic Design and Feasibility Study phase of the project.

That phase will include studying whether the building should be demolished or rebuilt, how big it can be, and whether the preliminary plans are realistic.

“I am pleased to welcome McKinley Elementary into the MSBA’s Capital Pipeline.  We are committed to working with Revere to find the most economical solution to the problems at McKinley so that the children of Revere can grow and learn in an educationally appropriate and safe facility,” said State Treasurer Steven Grossman.

“The MSBA is committed to working with Revere to better understand the deficiencies at the McKinley Elementary,” stated Katherine Craven, MSBA Executive Director. “We look forward to continuing our due diligence to determine what the best plan of action is moving forward.”

Ambrosino said he expects to submit a borrowing order for just under $1 million to the City Council this month.

He anticipates that the City will get 80 percent reimbursement from the state on the entire project. With an estimated $25 million to build the building, it would mean the City would have to pick up $5 million on its own.

The result would be $500,000 per year in debt payments starting in fiscal year 2014.

That, of course, is assuming the best-case scenario, and Ambrosino said that there is no reason that the building couldn’t be started in June 2012.

“I think it’s possible in 2012,” he said. “I would say that the worst case scenario is 2013. I will certainly do my part to complete the necessary steps in this calendar year during the rest of my tenure to prepare what needs to be done for a 2012 start.”

Councillors were unanimously in favor of going forward during a short discussion of the upcoming borrowing order at Monday’s City Council meeting.

Councillor George Rotondo – whose children attend the McKinley – said he has fought for the school and was happy to see it get into the pipeline.

“If all the stars align our children will no longer have to be educated in odd shaped rooms that seemed to be meant to store books, brooms and material or other equipment,” he wrote in a statement. “Our children will no longer have to have gym in the same room they eat in when the weather is inclimate. And certainly no one will be afraid of the floor caving in when we are having the yearly talent show…A new school means a new library, a library that is not pieced together in the halls of the school and it means new books for our children as well. A new school means less clutter and more area to teach and learn without feeling crammed.”

Ward 4 Councillor Stephen Reardon said the parents and staff at the McKinley have been very patient and deserve to have their school as soon as possible.

Ambrosino said that voters in the upcoming mayoral election ought to get a clear pledge from candidates before making a decision.

“The next mayor should be able to get the building started in 2012,” he said. “I think the citizens of this City ought to make sure the next mayor does that. They should get a commitment because it is very doable if it’s a priority.”

For the mayor, getting the project in the door – so to speak – appears to be his last major act as chief executive.

“The McKinley is in the capital pipeline and that’s what I wanted to accomplish this year,” he said. “It’s now accomplished…It was the last school-related matter I wanted to complete before my tenure ended and I’m very happy it’s completed. I ran initially saying I would build five school buildings and this is the fifth and it’s in the pipeline. There’s not much more I could have accomplished.”

 

By Seth Daniel

seth@reverejournal.com

The ball is officially rolling on the new McKinley School as the state School Building Authority (MSBA) approved the project for its capital pipeline last week.

Getting the school built has been a fight that has lasted several generations, with disgruntled parental advocates whose disappointments stretch back to the 1970s. And while no shovels are in the ground yet, it is the furthest anyone has come to replacing the 110-year-old school.

Mayor Tom Ambrosino was the driving force behind the approval, as was Superintendent Paul Dakin, and both said this week that not only did they get the ball rolling on the school, but they will probably get a much bigger school than anticipated.

Ambrosino said it could be a four-story school that could comfortably house 550 students – something desperately needed as elementary enrollment figures have soared over the last five years.

“We’re one of the few communities with a growing school population,” said the mayor. They recognize that and see the need for more space. They’re open to the fact this might need to be a much bigger building than what we contemplated 10 to 12 years ago.”

Being voted into the pipeline means that the City will have to pony up $1 million to enter into the Schematic Design and Feasibility Study phase of the project.

That phase will include studying whether the building should be demolished or rebuilt, how big it can be, and whether the preliminary plans are realistic.

“I am pleased to welcome McKinley Elementary into the MSBA’s Capital Pipeline.  We are committed to working with Revere to find the most economical solution to the problems at McKinley so that the children of Revere can grow and learn in an educationally appropriate and safe facility,” said State Treasurer Steven Grossman.

“The MSBA is committed to working with Revere to better understand the deficiencies at the McKinley Elementary,” stated Katherine Craven, MSBA Executive Director. “We look forward to continuing our due diligence to determine what the best plan of action is moving forward.”

Ambrosino said he expects to submit a borrowing order for just under $1 million to the City Council this month.

He anticipates that the City will get 80 percent reimbursement from the state on the entire project. With an estimated $25 million to build the building, it would mean the City would have to pick up $5 million on its own.

The result would be $500,000 per year in debt payments starting in fiscal year 2014.

That, of course, is assuming the best-case scenario, and Ambrosino said that there is no reason that the building couldn’t be started in June 2012.

“I think it’s possible in 2012,” he said. “I would say that the worst case scenario is 2013. I will certainly do my part to complete the necessary steps in this calendar year during the rest of my tenure to prepare what needs to be done for a 2012 start.”

Councillors were unanimously in favor of going forward during a short discussion of the upcoming borrowing order at Monday’s City Council meeting.

Councillor George Rotondo – whose children attend the McKinley – said he has fought for the school and was happy to see it get into the pipeline.

“If all the stars align our children will no longer have to be educated in odd shaped rooms that seemed to be meant to store books, brooms and material or other equipment,” he wrote in a statement. “Our children will no longer have to have gym in the same room they eat in when the weather is inclimate. And certainly no one will be afraid of the floor caving in when we are having the yearly talent show…A new school means a new library, a library that is not pieced together in the halls of the school and it means new books for our children as well. A new school means less clutter and more area to teach and learn without feeling crammed.”

Ward 4 Councillor Stephen Reardon said the parents and staff at the McKinley have been very patient and deserve to have their school as soon as possible.

Ambrosino said that voters in the upcoming mayoral election ought to get a clear pledge from candidates before making a decision.

“The next mayor should be able to get the building started in 2012,” he said. “I think the citizens of this City ought to make sure the next mayor does that. They should get a commitment because it is very doable if it’s a priority.”

For the mayor, getting the project in the door – so to speak – appears to be his last major act as chief executive.

“The McKinley is in the capital pipeline and that’s what I wanted to accomplish this year,” he said. “It’s now accomplished…It was the last school-related matter I wanted to complete before my tenure ended and I’m very happy it’s completed. I ran initially saying I would build five school buildings and this is the fifth and it’s in the pipeline. There’s not much more I could have accomplished.”

 

  • SFIPOGRAM

    bankrupt the city taxpayers some more, people are struggling to pay mortgages and put food on the table, more people will move here (renters) and we will pay the tab. the city needs leadership ,perhaps all city employees take a steep cut in pay with what most people make to finance all these ideas !!

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