Last Gasp – There’s still hope for casino legislation

August 12, 2010
By

The expanded gaming bill is not dead, yet.

There is the chance the legislation could come back to full blown life if the legislature is brought back into session, and soon.

That is a possibility because the state is set to receive $675 million in federal funding that would require the legislature to assign how it is spent.

The governor has artfully struck from that bill awarding the money the ability of the legislature to spend the money.

Obviously, both houses will want to come back, and soon, to override the governor’s action – so they can spend the money and be credited for it rather than him.

So now its up to the legislature to either commit political suicide by not coming back into session or to come back into session and while they’re at it, to once again take-up the gaming bill and to pass it.

Whether or not this scenario plays out is anyone’s guess.

One of the great oddities in this continuing story is that as the expanded gambling looked more dead than ever, more and more people close to the issue came to believe it might ultimately be passed in the end.

The owners of Suffolk Downs, who are the de facto owners of Wonderland, are holding off on layoffs or closures or radical changes in their business model – for the moment.

The owners of Suffolk Downs would like to bid on a casino license only.

Suffolk Downs is not interested in slots.

Slots are the rub.

Wonderland, owned by Suffolk Downs, is not interested in slots, either.

What has been proven by this up and down process?

That doing business with government – or with government trying to do business – it is a long and involved process that features personalities more than business expertise.

In the end, such a long and convoluted process has led to the ultimate impasse, with the legislature stalled, with the governor stalled, with the interests of private businesspeople willing to invest as much as $1 billion, stalled.

Whether or not the expanded gaming bill lives or dies now rests on politicians coming together or remaining at odds.

If it fails, and it might, there will be no torchlight parades with tens of thousands converging at the gates to the state house all chanting for casinos and slots.

It is not the kind of issue that inspires people that way.

If the bill passes, it will be a shot in the arm to the local economy of epic proportion if Suffolk Downs was granted a casino license.

Without this economic stimulus, we wonder rightfully, what might fill the gap?

Frankly, we are left to wonder about that.

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

  • Anonymous

    It Ain’t Over…

    Expanded gambling legislation may be stalled for now but this by no means signifies the end of the road. The Massachusetts market represents an untapped well of new money from new gamblers for the casino industry. They are not going away anytime soon. As a matter of fact the first annual “New England Gaming Summit” is scheduled to take place in September at Mohegan Sun. They are setting up shop here and they are in it for the long haul.

    What we’ve learned from the recently completed legislative session is that this is a complex issue and even if all parties agree on some aspects, there is still plenty that needs to be considered. Our political leaders at the local and state levels are not experts on the impact expanded gambling would have on our state and host communities. The fact is they haven’t even consulted with any independent experts. Sure they’ll tell you they have but they’re only relying on information that portrays the benefits while dismissively repeating, “the benefits will greatly outweigh the costs.”

    Really? What are those costs? Where is the comprehensive study that enumerates and quantifies those costs? Why is it that they can recite the number of jobs, amount of money spent at Connecticut casinos by Mass. residents and the expected revenue by rote but they don’t have a clue what the costs may be and how to address them?

    This is Massachusetts, home to the best colleges, universities and hospitals in the world. From Boston to the Berkshires, Cape Cod to Cape Ann. we are steeped in history, tradition, culture and a unique character that is all our own. People come from all over the world to experience what we enjoy regularly.

    Is this the best we can do? Expanding gambling? Is this how we plan to solve our fiscal woes? By rigging up thousands of slot machines? Is that how you would solve a financial problem in your own house? By heading to a casino?

    Shouldn’t we expect more from Beacon Hill? Shouldn’t we expect that our elected officials would be wise enough to weigh the costs along with the benefits? Shouldn’t our leaders consult with independent economists? Can’t we find some other way to raise or cut 1.5% of our budget?

    No, the fight isn’t over. The casino industry and their minions in the State House wanted us to believe it was. I was told just two months ago: that “the debate was over”, that all that was left to determine were the “zoning issues”, that it was a “done deal”. Casinos in Massachusetts are not inevitable and we control the dialogue now. We have gained the upper hand over the casino lobbyists who spent $1.8 million in the first half of this year.

    It’s up to us to protect our families, our communities and our way of life. If we won’t rise to that responsibility who will?

    Call the Governor, all of the gubernatorial candidates, and our legislators and ask them to commit to an Independent Cost Benefit Analysis before considering another piece of gambling legislation.

    I will be speaking at the next Orient Heights Neighborhood Association meeting on Monday, August 16th around 7:45 PM at the Madonna Queen National Shrine Hall, 150 Orient Ave., East Boston, MA.

    John Ribeiro
    http://www.NeighborsOfSuffolkDowns.org

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