Distributing contraceptives in the public schools

August 26, 2009
By

Suspending the current School Department contraceptive distribution program is a backward step.

No one in the public schools is forced to accept contraceptives or to use them.

As such, the present program makes them available to those who want to use them.

Efforts at abstention and chastity among high schoolers, and even among those in junior high school, have largely failed – and not because young people are any worse than their elders but because society has changed, sexual mores have changed and even how society meets this brave new world has changed.

Offering contraceptives to young people who are absolutely going to have unprotected sex makes good sense.

If contraceptives are used by young people determined to have sex, there will be fewer transmissions of the AIDS virus and fewer unwanted pregnancies.

This is the purpose of the School Department’s contraceptive program.

  • Jack Hoover

    Why that is a bunch of baloney. Making condoms available to kids because you feel they are going to have sex anyway likens itself to the addage “if my kid is going to use drugs I might as well supply him with good clean needles!” Society has not changed. Basically, we are having sex the same way as humans have for thousands of years. Nothing has changed about that. What society can stomach has certainly changed and having a “if it feels good do it” mentality is not the way to control children having children.

    Educating these young people as to the consequences of their actions and hope they like most of us take it to heart and “try” to control what we do and understand the serious nature of fathering a child is the only way to try and stem the tide of children out of wedlock. Bear in mind a 14 year old boy can father a child, but I submit to you a 14 year old boy will find it hard to be a father.

    Making birth control devices easily available to young people especially in our school systems is NOT what the schools are there for. That is the parents responsibility. Providing condoms to young people is giving “positive” re-inforcement for ones negative behavior and that scenairo never wins the test of time. Granted, if they are gonna do it so be it, but let us not make it easy for them by providing these devices and giving them the false impression that we rather they not use them

    Schools need to worry about a childs intellect, not their sex organs. If this is typical Boston area’s feelings on these matters I am glad to be here in Iowa. Corn anyone?

  • Jack Hoover

    Why that is a bunch of baloney. Making condoms available to kids because you feel they are going to have sex anyway likens itself to the addage “if my kid is going to use drugs I might as well supply him with good clean needles!” Society has not changed. Basically, we are having sex the same way as humans have for thousands of years. Nothing has changed about that. What society can stomach has certainly changed and having a “if it feels good do it” mentality is not the way to control children having children.

    Educating these young people as to the consequences of their actions and hope they like most of us take it to heart and “try” to control what we do and understand the serious nature of fathering a child is the only way to try and stem the tide of children out of wedlock. Bear in mind a 14 year old boy can father a child, but I submit to you a 14 year old boy will find it hard to be a father.

    Making birth control devices easily available to young people especially in our school systems is NOT what the schools are there for. That is the parents responsibility. Providing condoms to young people is giving “positive” re-inforcement for ones negative behavior and that scenairo never wins the test of time. Granted, if they are gonna do it so be it, but let us not make it easy for them by providing these devices and giving them the false impression that we rather they not use them

    Schools need to worry about a childs intellect, not their sex organs. If this is typical Boston area’s feelings on these matters I am glad to be here in Iowa. Corn anyone?

  • Stephen DiCologero

    Please site your source evidence that “efforts at abstention and chasity…have largely failed.” I dare say the numbers would suprise you. Where programs that you dismiss are in place, real reductions can be seen. But if you’re bent on a certain outcome rather than the truth, why, by all means, spout your drival…maybe ill informed folks will continue to listen to you. For my money, I don’t think our kids are as farm animals that will “absoulutely…have unprotected sex.” I give them and their parents more credit than that. A little encouragement goes a long way. The students you dismiss are capable and can be responsible in their behavior and shouldn’t be trivialized either in their moral code or in their reasoning abilities. What say you?

  • Stephen DiCologero

    Please site your source evidence that “efforts at abstention and chasity…have largely failed.” I dare say the numbers would suprise you. Where programs that you dismiss are in place, real reductions can be seen. But if you’re bent on a certain outcome rather than the truth, why, by all means, spout your drival…maybe ill informed folks will continue to listen to you. For my money, I don’t think our kids are as farm animals that will “absoulutely…have unprotected sex.” I give them and their parents more credit than that. A little encouragement goes a long way. The students you dismiss are capable and can be responsible in their behavior and shouldn’t be trivialized either in their moral code or in their reasoning abilities. What say you?

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